Keith Skelton, photo workshop instructor and photojournalist, is leading a one-day photo workshop on the streets of Los Angeles, specifically to the Los Angeles Arts District, LA Chinatown, Highland Park and Boyle Heights in East Los Angeles. Workshop participants will meet in the morning at the Los Angeles Union Station (Amtrak station) and then head to The Arts District, near Little Tokyo. A full-day of photo activities is planned with stops in Chinatown, the historic Mariachi Plaza in Boyle Heights and Highland Park in northeast Los Angeles. (Commuting is done by walking and the LA Metro.)


Street photography is arguably one of the most challenging kinds of photography because of its documentary nature.  It can also be one of the most fun and rewarding because it allows for the creation of personal statements through the streets contrary nature. Practiced by such legendary photographers as Henri Cartier-Bresson, Garry Winogrand, Robert Doisneau, Robert Frank, Burk Uzzle, and Elliott Erwitt, street photography is a form of candid photography that often defies and challenges the rules of composition and technique.


Street photography also requires getting close to people. Shooting photographs of strangers in public places takes some courage, fast reflexes, and basic camera gear. To do this type of shooting successfully you have to be part of the scene, not the usual distant observer. Good street photography is about telling a story in a single frame by skillfully anticipating actions and interactions. It is about seeing visual puns, irony, serendipity, and humorous incongruities in an often muddled world. Street photography is all about the ability to artfully capture singular and often solitary moments of life.


This workshop provides many diverse locations with street art, color

and graphics.


Instruction includes:


-Learning how to transform everyday life situations into powerful images.


-Learning how to quicken reflexes and become more self-assured

photographing strangers in public locations.


-Learning how to approach and photograph a portrait of a stranger.


-Learning about anti-composition, shooting from the hip, in your face,

 and working a corner photography.


There will be discussion about the  best equipment and camera settings to use

and how to get the most out of a compact digital or film camera. There will

also be discussion about iconic street photographers and how they may have

viewed a particular street scene.


To reserve space for a California Photography Workshop, click below.

PHOTOGRAPHING THE STREETs OF LOS ANGELES


LOS ANGELES ARTS DISTRICT / EAST LOS ANGELES - PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP - NOVEMBER 10, 2012

Learn how to photograph the moment while exploring the streets and culture of Los Angeles, California.

-SEE PHOTOS FROM THE LOS ANGELES STREET WORKSHOP HERE

-PHOTOS OF THE ARTS DISTRICT HERE

-AND HERE.






This is a documentary about Garry Winogrand with Bill Moyers, Creativity, WNET, 1982


REGISTRATION AND PAYMENT FORM IS HERE 


FEES $159.00

Payments by check within three weeks advance of the workshop receive a 10% discount. Returning students receive a 10% discount.

The workshop fee does not include hotel accommodations, meals, entrance fees, transportation costs, etc.

Enrollment limit: 12 students per session.










Contact calphotoworkshops@earthlink.net for details.


WHAT YOU NEED TO BRING:


Bring whatever cameras, iphone, you are most comfortable using. It will be presumed you are familiar with the camera’s operation and functions. Please note that some people are intimidated by a photographer using a large DSLR with a telephoto lens. If there is a choice, opt for a smaller, less obtrusive camera. Most serious street photographers use some sort of rangefinder camera such as the Leica M or the Voigtlander Bessa film camera. I regularly use small compact digital cameras such as the Panasonic LX3, GF1, Canon G11 and even the I-Phone. Any camera will work for this class, though.


Be prepared for a day of walking. I will be sending out further details after registration.


Photography by Keith Skelton